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Southern Classic Bike Show – Kempton Park

KP May 23 2015 003 (s)The Surrey Branch of the NOC had a stand and bike display at the 23 May 2015 Southern Classic Bike Show at Kempton Park . In the picture above are Geoff Cole, Patrick Bullimore, Andy Neal, Dave Gibson, Mike Duffell, and Ken Rawlinson. We assembled seven bikes for display that covered the wide spectrum of years of Norton Motorcycles.

Those that displayed their bikes were:

Ken Rawlinson        1972 JPN Commando PR

Mike Duffell              1953 Manx Norton Model 40, ex Des Craig 350cc

Dave Gibson             1935 350 International

Andy Neal                 1967 Norton P11 desert Racer

Anthony Curzon      1960 99 café racer, with a 1955 wideline featherbed frame

Patrick Bulimore       1971 Commando Fastback

Geoff Cole                 1968 Commando fastback

All the stands equipment was organised and transported to the show by the very efficient Mike Duffell. Mike arranged for all the tea, coffee, as well as the kettle and the water to be on site so we all had a hot drinks all through out the day. Many of our Surrey section members arrived to help on the stand and to give us all support so that some of us could get away, and collect some parts from the massive auto-jumble. We had allot of people come to our stand with allot of technical questions that we all tried and managed to answer.

Anthony's Front Brake

Anthony’s Front Brake

We had a huge amount of visitors many wanted to sign up and asked about membership, and some for renewals. The bikes only display really gave our stand an out standing display. I was reliably informed by my friend Victor Clark who came down from Enfield to visit us, that many visitors would spin the front wheel on my café racer, and then apply the front brake lever to see if it actually worked. Dave Degens came by and I showed him my front brake, and he informed me that only about 6 or 7 of them were made as they did not have as much brake feel as the larger double sided eight shoe brake had. He and NOC President Mike Jackson were doing the judging for the show.

We also had Julie Diplock, the organizer of the Ardingly Real Classic shows come and visit us on our stand. Julie was explaining to us about the revamp and changes to her summer show in July.

Andy and I rode to the show in the morning and arrived at about 9am. As per usual the road from Hampton Court to Kempton Park had road works, and a huge hole with road works had been dug in the road but we managed to go down the out side and therefore circumnavigate it; but on the way back it was awful. The traffic due to these very restricted road works make going to Kempton Park in a car, a real chore.  We managed to get by down the out side of the traffic but I felt really sorry for all those folks stuck in a jam due to the idiots that continue to always dig up that road on a continuous basis. Riding a café racer in such close proximity to this line of cars was very stressful.

The organisers gave every one a cup with motorcycle transfers on them for all those that displayed a bike. It was a really go show, and the auto-jumble was huge, and the auto-jumble was packed with prospective buyers.

Can I thank all those that participated and help with our stand, and all those that brought along their bikes for display? To Mike Duffell for his organizational skill, and keeping calm when we needed to get it all erected and then packed away. Well we rocked it totally, and knocked it out of the park!

Anthony Curzon

 

Press Officer

Surrey Branch NOC

South of England Real Classic Show – Ardingly 29th March 2015

The Surrey section had it’s regular stand at the South of England Real Classic Show & Bike Jumble on the 29 March 2015. The day started badly for us as we were going to take three bikes, and had arranged for an early start, but it never went as it was planned to go. The weather had a very large impact on the final out come to it all. Andy Neal was going to ride my single seat P11, but when he arrived he looked and he felt really ill, so Nigel and I sent him home. Nigel Heugh was going to ride my Norton 750ss, but that decided to jam one of its throttle slides and I then pulled out the 1966 N15CS, and Nigel rode the single seat P11. I was going to ride my Dominator café racer, but then the weather decided to be a real pain, as it rained constantly from the time we left till the time we arrived. Riding a desert racer is so much easier in the rain, than my café racer. Both bikes played up and I am convinced that desert racers do not like the rain or winter. We both set off in the appalling weather, and we did not arrive till about 10.45, soaking wet and in real need of a hot cup of tea.

Nigel with Anthonys P11Julie Diplock welcomed Nigel and I on arrival and thanked us for attending. Julie organises a brilliant show, and it is a highly recommended event. Her team of helpers are very efficient, and make the day a very enjoyable event even though the weather did not help with this endeavour.

The stand had already been assembled, very ably by the other members of the section. Mike Duffel brought all the stands equipment, assisted by our chainman Steven Eccleshall who helped to load it all. Chris Barraclough, Brian Howard, Dave Gibson and Geoff Cole all helped to erect the stand, and other accessories need to make an impressive display. Mike always the most efficient organizer made sure that there was always enough tea, coffee and the required biscuits for all those that attended, and displayed their bikes. The weather being awful, as it rained most of the day, so it was not that good an event for the out side traders.

fastback on show1We have a new attendee that is now a fully paid up member of the branch, Patrick Bullimore who brought along and displayed his amazingly and beautifully restored 1971 Commando Fastback. This was displayed up on the section’s plinth for all the show goers to see and admire.

The good news was that the P11 and Mike Duffel’s Manx Norton were presented with a 2nd class award at the show. The P11 was presented with the 2nd for the 1960 to 1969 section and Mike Duffel was presented with a 2nd for the 1950 to 1959 section. Mike has been taking his Manx Norton to this show for many years and it was a great joy to see he has been finally rewarded with an award for all his efforts for the sections stand, and presentation.

Mike with his ManxIt was very disappointing that Patrick Bullimore’s Fastback never achieved an award as it was hugely deserving of one. Many of the show goers came over to tell Patrick that it was the best bike at the show. Many visitor explained to Patrick that it was the best bike at the show, and it really did deserve an award, so may be another show and Patrick’s bike will get a well deserved award.

Those members that brought along their bikes for display on our stand were as follows

Brian Howard           1965 400 electric start, Electra

Geoff Cole                 1968 Commando Fastback from the first batch of Commando’s made

Ken Rawlinson        1972 Commando JPN PR that has been signed by the great Peter Williams

Mike Duffel               1953 Model 40 the ex Des Craig Manx Norton, with allot of ex factory parts fitted to it

Chris Barraclough   1940 16H

Dave Gibson             1937 Model 50

Dave Carpenter        1948 350 Manx Norton

Nigel Heugh             1967 Norton P11 high pipe, single seat, desert racer

Anthony Curzon      1966 Norton N15CS desert racer

Patrick Bullimore      1971 Commando Fastback

Then every one pitched in to getting the stand and plinth packed away, and Chris Barraclough our disassembly magician for the plinth, making the disassembly look easy. The stand and all the equipment being packed away and loaded into Mike Duffel’s car and onto his trailer.

At least the ride home for Nigel Heugh, Geoff Cole and I was not too bad as the sun came out, and the roads had almost dried out. The A22 was almost empty, and I was really enjoying the company. The last time I saw some one ride a P11 that good was Dean Nissen, riding back home on his own P11 from the USNOA Pacific Rim Rally in McCleary in 1998. Just to watch Nigel on the P11 was a joy to watch, and then we got to the M25 part of the A22 that went under the M25. Nigel was through the centre of the traffic and on it. Talk about now you see him and now you don’t and he was gone and Nigel really does ride that bike very well. We got to just under the bridge and there was Nigel waiting for us. Up the A22 onto the Caterham by pass and onto Whyteleafe, and then the rain just fell down. Geoff had turned off earlier, and Nigel and I progressed on our way, and it then became a very unpleasant ride back home. We got home really wet, and my riding cloths took over three days to dry out.

Rick Parkington with ACCan I thank all those that came along to our show, brought their bikes, and helped man the stand, helped, advise, and to talk to and engage with the many visitors that came to our stand. Our next Surrey section show event will be at the Southern Classic Bike Show & Jumble on the 23 May 2015. This is being organized by our own Ken Rawlinson, and we hope to get a good selection of bikes to display on our stand. The section is also in a state of flux over a new meeting venue. We have some new talks coming up for the section, or that will be when the next sections meeting place has been finalized. We also have the Caple Show on 15th August, and this is a really good event to attend, as it is a really great transport show to enjoy.  The section will be displaying our stand as well as a selection of member’s bikes that will be also be on display. There is also our Surrey section Norton Day at Brooklands on the 12th July, and on the 4th July a Ride for the Troops. We will also have a stand and a display at the next Ardingly show, 25th October 2015. Please contact our secretary Ken Rawlinson for more details concerning these events if you want to attend.

Anthony Curzon

Press Officer for the Surrey Branch

New Club Night Meeting Venue

steppingstonesnightWe’ve Moved!

Following an exhaustive search where your hard working Branch committee has had the arduous task of having to sample the beer at hundreds of different pubs around Surrey, t’ committee has made a decision. Yes it’s the Stepping Stones near Box Hill!

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Come and see at our next meeting night on Wednesday 8th April. The Pub is friendly has great beer – a proper function room and a large car park … Perfect! We think it’s a great venue – but what do you think?

 

Surrey Branch Annual Dinner

P1020465For the Surrey Branch Christmas meal on the 31 January 2015, we had a very special after-dinner speaker. It was Colin Seeley who was very enthusiastically welcomed by us all. He brought along a picture of Barry Sheene racing a Seeley framed Gus Kuhn Norton which was put up for auction, along with other raffle prizes in aid of  the Joan Seeley Pain Relief Memorial Trust. The venue for the dinner was held at the Leatherhead Golf Club, and a very respectable total of 42 members, their wives and guests attended the event.

All money collected on the evening is spent on equipment, as the trust has no paid administration costs or officers. Their chairman is Colin Seeley, and if any members want to make a contribution to this very worthwhile Charity Trust, please find more details through this link.

Set up at the front of the dining room, by our very own Mike Duffell, were two boards with photo’s of his relative, Joe Craig, and others of  Manx Norton’s. There were also pictures of the assembled members of the branch at the Real Classic Ardingly Show, and the Kempton Park Classic Shows, for all to see. Colin Seeley also provided an excellent selection of photos for display.

Our compère for the evening (also by coincidence named Colin) gave a very detailed introduction of Colin Seeley’s life story for the beginning of his talk .

P1020482Colin started with the time he went to Brands Hatch when he was just 14 to watch the races there, with his friend Wally Rawlings. When he was older, he then started racing himself.  Initially with an AJS 7R which he in turn sold and bought an ex Eric Oliver sidecar outfit. Wally was the passenger for the outfit, and according to Colin, Wally was one of the best passengers, and this also was the opinion of the ex world Champion sidecar racer Eric Oliver.

Colin then raced in the Isle of Man TT races where he learned the course by doing lots of practice laps! He used a Matchless G50 with a sidecar attached to it. AMC did not approve of this arrangement, until they saw that he came in sixth in his first race. Early morning practice Colin explained was at 4am in the morning and they wheeled their sidecar outfit out of the garage very quietly till with a run an bump, and the noise was deafening he said till he managed to get off down the road. Colin became very firm friends with the late and very respected sidecar racer Florian Camathias.

P1020448Colin holds the record for the fastest single cylinder sidecar out fit for a TT lap, and it has never been beaten. He got a TT replica for finishing third. This was a silver TT replica, and this he brought along to show us all.He went on to build his own frames in 1965-1966, and he also built his own sidecar frames. He frames have become legendary in the racing world, and he had constructed frames for a huge amount of different engines. The  first frame that he built was ridden by the late, and now very lamented Derek Minter, the ‘King of Brands’.

P1020473Colin then went on the explain about his building of bikes, and the many stories connected with this. This was a remarkable tale of a time  in 1967 when his workshop had lost two sets of very expensive Shaftlitner gear clusters that had somehow been thrown away by mistake. Colin went to the local council tip  – intent on retrieving them. After many hours of looking through the deposited of waste in his area, he eventually managed to find them wrapped up in old newspaper and retrieve them from the tip.   He was very relieved to have found them!

Colin went on the explain about his involvement in Formula 1, and  the Norton Rotary racing team. This came about after he answered an advert that he saw in Motorcycle News. This is and was a very convoluted tale, and it is fully explained in Colin’s second book. He managed to get sponsorship from Duckhams Oil’s for Brian Creighton’s Rotary racers. Colin’s talk went on for over an hour and we were all enthralled by his tales, and recollections of those halcyon days when British bikes, frames and engines were a ‘must have’ item to have any chance of winning.

Colin was there with is lovely wife Eva. Colin explained about his charity in memory of his wife Joan who so sadly passed away at a very young age. This charity has been going for over 36 years, and has helped a huge amount of people with the funds that it has raised.

P1020484The raffle raised £245, and the picture of Barry Sheene that Colin supplied raised £130. This was finally bought by our very own Ken Rawlinson after a lot of bidding by our membership and also a lot of encouragement by Colin Seeley himself. Barry Stickland donated his expenses  from his talk so the amount raised for the Joan Seeley Charity was £395. Strange to say I saw Barry Sheene when he was very young when I worked at Gus Kuhn Motors, when he came to visit us to see Vincent Davey. Little did I know that back then in 1969 that I was looking at a future world champion, standing with is dad in our workshop talking to our own Johnny Leggett.

May I thank all those on our committee for making this occasion a very memorable evenings event, we have been sent many emails thanking us for this very well organised occasion. To Mike Duffell our facilities coordinator for his brilliant display of photographs. Dave Gibson our events coordinator who painted a picture of Colin Seeley and Wally Rawlings in their racing sidecar outfit, and this was then presented to Colin by our secretary Ken Rawlinson. To Colin Beale our DJ and compère, for his selection of music and his brilliant control of the event. Also to our Chairman, Steve Eccleshall for his liaison with the golf club, getting the compère, and making the sure the event ran very smoothly. To our Treasurer Geoff Cole whole sorted out some last minute glitches that occurred with the golf club and the meal. To our secretary Ken Rawlinson, who liaised with Colin Seeley and arranged for him to give us a talk, and for organising his hotel, and all his aftercare. All out hard work paid off and we rocked it totally. Can I also thank Colin Seeley and his lovely wife Eva, for making this Christmas dinner the success it was. The raffle was also a great success, and Colin donated one of his books which he has personally signed, as a raffle prize. The table that Colin was on seemed to be winning all the prizes, (that was mine) and I managed to bag Colin’s book and two raffle other prizes. I asked to give the third one back, as I am allergic to alcohol, but I was told it was a pack of soap so I should have it.

The Surrey sections are organizing many events and speakers that will be coming up for the forth coming year for all our members to attend. Our next ones will be the Real Classic Ardingly Classic show, and the Kempton Park Classic show where we shall be displaying our members bikes and we will there in attendance to welcome our members and also hopefully any new members who may want to join us.

Anthony Curzonseeleypic

My Dominator Cafe Racer – by Anthony Curzon

P1020404My Norton cafe racer is featured in the book written by Alistair King, The Cafe Racer Phenomenon, on page 23, 24 and 25. I built it in my bedroom on the second floor of my council flat in Manor House, North London, back in 1976 and 1977. I had exchanged my 1950 BSA ZB32 Gold Star, as this had the wrong frame and the Gold Star engine. I exchanged it at Honour Oak Motorcycles, of 29 Honor Oak Park, South East London in June 1976. South London for a 1955, wideline Featherbed frame, and front forks, and a complete John Tickle twin leading front brake in a Dunlop alloy rimed wheel. The bottom half of a 600cc Dominator 99 bottom end, came from Mayo Motorcycles in Thornton Heath. I put it on the road and rode it around allot in North London. The long bodied Gardener carburettors that I fitted I could not get to work, so I fitted a pair of Amal 930 Concentric. These are now controlled by a twin pull twist grip. I also used a BTH twin magneto for the ignition, and I had it checked over by a so called specialist, and it was then deemed suitable for use. When it was being ridden it would just cut out. I would sit by the road, and wait for it to cool down, and then it would run again. Those were the days that I did not know about a duff capacitor. This would also happen to the two BTH magneto’s on a 1949 Percival Prentice that I used to fly, that is now in the RAF museum in Hendon.

 

The engine was rebuilt and put together by the famous ex works AMC race mechanic, Jimmy Boughen. I first met Jim when I was working at Gus Kuhn Motors in the spares department and he built the engines for the Gus Kuhn racers. So years later I tracked him down and asked him to build my engine for me.The bills for that engine from back then make you weep at the low cost of doing all that very extensive work to this engine. He charged me £8 to balance the crankshaft, £4 to polish the conrods, £12 to gas flow, polish and port the cylinder head, and £9 to polish four rockers and the valve collars.

 

The cylinder head is a 650ss one, and the bottom half was a 99 Dominator 600 from 1960, with a polished  crankshaft, and polished conrods.The motor was also upgraded with the later oiling modifications. The larger crankcase oil feed, oil pipes and oil junction block. The pressure feed to the rockers came from the timing cover,  with the scrolled rocker spindles replaced with the smooth ones. Jimmy drilled holes in the conrods for the cylinder bore’s lubrication. A six start oil pump and gears was used, and the piston rings were changed to stop the over oiling. I originally fitted a Dickenson cam, that Jimmy worked out the timing for, but it was so vicious when riding it, that I changed it when the bike and engine went through its second rebuild.

 

P1020401The CMA front brake I bought from Jim Long who then owned Cornucopia Enterprises in Barking, South London for £50. At the Capel show I met Dave Degans, and he told me it was a Degens front brake, but made by CMA. He also explained that he only produced 6 or 7 of them in total, so it is now very rare. It did not work that well till the later rebuild many years later.

 

To get the bike registered for a number plate I went along to the DVLA that was then housed at County Hall. I sat in the queue and saw a man about getting it registered. I was then informed I needed an MOT, and then to return. I told him as I did not have a registration number I could not ride it on the road. This did not phase him as he told me that it was perfectly legal to do so. I then asked him for a letter so that if I got pulled over I had proof of what he said. Reluctantly he agreed, and he gave me a letter. I booked myself in to S & B Scooters Ltd, on 217 Streatham Road, Mitcham South London. I wanted to go for a long ride. On my way through Brixton the motor cut out, and I sat waiting for it to cool off. It started again and off I went. I was then flagged down by a Police car that asked me where my rear number plate was? I then pulled out the letter from the DVLA. This he then took it to his colleague in the car with the exclamation, “have you seen this” They both read it, and he came back and sent me on my way. This was on April 21 1978. It was MOTed on the frame number, then back to County Hall and I got a registration number. The mechanic that worked full time in that shop at that time was one Len Patterson, and I saw his Triumph Baby Blue up on a bench in the workshop. This was along time before he opened his own workshop in Wimbledon.

 

I moved from North London to South London and got married. That crashed and burned, so the cafe racer took a back seat while I collected P11’s and the N15CS desert racers. The time came to get it restored, and Stan Wheeler did allot of the work for me. I had by then fitted a Norvil front disc brake, but when Stan took it away, I gave him the CMA front brake that had been living in the wardrobe for 20 years, and gave him the CMA front wheel, and put the Norvil front wheel back in the wardrobe where is to this day.

 

The frame was powdered coated black, and the wheels were both rebuilt with stainless steel spokes. It has a belt drive on the primary side, so I have fitted a Commando cush drive rear wheel, with an alloy rim. The Commando clutch does not have a shock absorber like the previous Atlas one. The original alloy rimed wheels are now in the loft in boxes. Stan sorted out the CMA front brake and it now works really well, as Stan explained it did need allot of work to make it function properly. This being the reason that my friend Victor Clark and I could never get it to work correctly, hence the changing to a Norvil disc front brake.

 

The ignition is now by a BTH electronic magneto, and the 12 volt electronics have a PODtronics power module, so that the Zenor diode and the Lucas rectifier could be dispensed with. It uses a Lucas RM21 alternator, and a Lucas wiring loom, with other Lucas components for the lights. The primary cover was powder coated black, and the cover had a hole cut in it to cool the primary drive.

 

The swinging arm has a Manx conversion, care of a Norvil Motorcycles kit, and the rear shocks are Manx ones by NJB. The petrol tank I bought direct from Lyta when he had a workshop in Lowfield Street in Dartford. The seat was originally a metal paned Manx Norton one (also now in a box in the loft) and it was replaced by a fibre glass Manx Norton replica one. The alloy levers are Amal ones, that I had, had in a draw for over 30 years so I used them, rather that the chromed steel one. I used to get all my chrome plating done by Cornucopia Enterprises, and Jim Long did the best chrome plating  by any company and it was so tough, it never marked. The oil tank is a copy the last Manx Norton ones, and the front and rear mudguards are also of the Manx Norton type. I originally fitted a 650ss rear mudguard, but that went into the loft, and the Manx Norton one took its place.The headlamp brackets also came from Norvil, and they are their custom type ones. The Speedo and revcounter, I bought new from Auto Tempo who had a shop back then in Kings Cross. Back then I thought they were expensive but not at what they would cost me today to have built from new parts. The engine plates came from Converter, and are made in alloy, and all or most of the nuts, bolts and washers are in stainless steel. The rear silencers are of the Paul Dunstal type and the swept back exhaust pipes I picked up along the way. I originally had a special two into one exhaust system made, and it really howled when you were on it, but the swept back pipes give it that much better period look. The exhaust collars are 850 Commando ones. The rear sets I think are may be John Tickle ones but I am not sure of this.

 

Back in 1968,1969 I owned a really nice cafe racer that I had bought from Coburn & Hughes, and once more I was forced to sell it due to marriage concerns. So I always wanted to build another one almost like that one. I think this one is far better than the fist one I had owned in the late 1960’s. So with out the aid of Stan Wheeler and other suppliers this bike would still be languishing in my shed.

 

I hope to be able to display the bike on the Surrey sections NOC stand at the next Real Classic Ardingly Show on the 29 October 2015.

 

Anthony Curzon

Barry Stickland talk

P1020413The Surrey section on 14 January 2015, was delighted to welcome the NOC’s Camshaft Singles Technical advice specialist Barry Stickland to give us a very in-depth talk about all the aspects and history of Norton’s camshaft singles. This was organized for us by our very own Mike Duffell, and Dave Gibson. There were 23 members of the branch that came to this very informative talk by Barry. If you did not manage to attend then you missed an amazing event.

Barry explained that he has been the specialist adviser for the club for over 20 years, and his most asked questions are “So how much is it worth” and the paint lining on the petrol tank.

Barry went on to explain how he started his motorcycling with the use of an Ariel Arrow two stroke. He then wanted to go racing and acquired a BSA Gold Star. He found one that was cheap and that needed work. He bought the BMS Book of the Gold Star, and rebuilt the Gold Star engine using it. He did some practice laps at Brands Hatch, the Kent racing circuit, and his first race was at Snetterton’s where Manx Norton’s and G50 Matchless’s passed him easily on the straights. He then sold the Gold Star, and bought a Manx Norton. He taught himself to build the long and short stroke singles.

Barry Stickland 1Barry after telling us about his racing history and experiences, then went on to explain to us the story concerning the camshafts singles history. The precursor to the Manx was the TT25 in 1927. Walter Moore then designed the CS1 OHC single, but after a disagreement with Norton’s, as Walter wanted to be on the board of directors, he took his designs and left. Walter Moore went to NSU and used the CS1 design to the advantage of the German company. As Walter Moore owned the rights to the CS1 the bottom half of the CS1 was redesigned by Arthur Carroll. The main difference between the two engines were the bottom half, and a vernier adjustment to the camshafts. This gave the camshaft adjustments a lot of different permutations, and made it far easier to adjust than the older CS1 design.

The International came out in the early 1930’s and the CS engines carried on till 1939. The International’s were of a more sporting bike.The camshaft singles used hairpin valve springs as the coil verity were not that reliable back then, and the coil valve springs broke far to easily. Norton’s also copied the BMW telescopic front forks, and Barry showed us all a picture of the great Freddie Frith studying a BMW with these fitted on the start line of an international race meeting.

P1020418Barry then went on to tell us all about the so called Suicide Stand. Norton’s in their infinite wisdom decided to place the rear stand, so in stead of it locking backwards,it locked forwards. It was fitted round the wrong way. All owners of these machines, make sure that the centre stand is fully secured before they leave when going out for a ride. Our own Roger Deadman has such a stand on one of his own camshaft singles and he fully understands the implications if this stand were to come loose, which can have disastrous consequences for the bike and the rider. So hence the very appt name the Suicide Stand. This stand was moved so that it locked back wards in a later redesign. Norton’s issued a catalogue for 1940 that was only sent to Austria, and it showed the telescopic front forks fitted to a camshaft single. A few Norton Manx’s were produced in 1940, These frames had the lugs for both types of stand fitted to them. To tell if the frame was originally fitted with girder or telescopic fork there is a very simple check that the owner can do. If the headstock has one grease nipple it had telescopic forks, if it has two grease nipples it had girder forks fitted. In 1948 still with the SOHC engine, but as the pre-war engine but with a re design of the crankcases it went back into production.

Now we come to the part that Leo Kuzmicki (pronounced Kootsmitsky) the brilliant Polish professor and engineer that was employed sweeping the floors of the post Norton factory, played in the development of the camshaft singles story. It was Leo that was introduced to Joe Craig after he had a discussion about the camshaft engines with the race engineer Charlie Edwards. After the war the Poles had to leave the country or find an employer that would give them a job for seven years. This is what Gilbert Smith did for Leo, and it was a constant source of annoyance, and a very big grievance for Leo as Gilbert Smith still paid Leo, sweepers wages even though he went on to hugely improve the camshafts singles engines power out put. As soon as he could and he had the chance he went to Vanwall and designed their GP winning cars by using for Manx Norton top half’s on a common crankcase. This engine even used Amal GP carburettors.

P1020422It was Leo that introduced the squish band to the cylinder heads with a modified piston and cylinder head. One of these pistons was passed around by Barry to the eager assembled audience, along with other pictures. Geoff Duke said that it wasn’t the frame that he won first time out, but the huge boost in power from the engine, Barry told us. This was later taken up by Velocette who used it on the 500 Venom, that became the Thruxton that came first and second in the 1967 Isle of Man TT races. The Thruxton’s cylinder came from an American called Lou Branch who sent it over to England for an evaluation by the Velocette factory. Leo went on the design the Hillman Imp all alloy the 875cc, rear mounted engine. Leo sadly passed away in 1982, having been a WW2 fighter pilot for this country. Leo was a very clever and intelligent man that Norton’s should really have cherished, and it can only be surmised at what an impact he could or would have made if he had been treated much better by Norton’s management. He was huge loss to Norton’s later expectations.

Barry also went on the explain to us how not to get caught by the camshaft single being placed in a single 16H frame. This is some thing that can happen to the less knowledgeable when buying a camshaft single. I asked Barry about this so that I got it correct. Barry said that the Inter and Manx rear plungers lean forward, and the road frames plungers are straight up. This can be a very costly mistake if the bike you are looking at is being sold to your as genuine Manx or Inter but in a road going frame. The first featherbed frames had to be redesigned as there was a fault with the rear of the frame that would break the rear suspension. Barry still has one of the early unmodified frames.

Our very own Mike Duffell that owns the ex Des Craig Manx Norton, had a very special gearbox, that Barry took apart and inspected. Mike is related to the Craig family. This gearbox was nothing like Barry had ever seen before, as the shafts were thicker, and the gears came out on two rails. It was never put into production which is a very great shame and a loss to the camshaft racers.

Barry went on the explain about Norton’s camshaft singles not being very oil tight. Barry by profession works in the aviation industry. He works on hydraulic and oxygen systems for Airbus and also the Trent aero engines. He runs the hydraulic and fuel side for his company. Barry built a pressure tester to show him where the oil leaks were coming from in the cam box on the camshafts singles. By using this he has managed to cure all the oil leaks that the camshaft singles are known for, using this his own design of pressure tester. He passed around some rocker arms to show us the source of one of the oil leaks that he did not know about till subjected to his pressure tester. Note to Norton single camshaft owners, if you want to cure your cam boxes leaks send it the Barry Stickland.

P1020420Barry also showed us some special gearbox gears. The gearboxes on the camshaft singles had close gears, and there was a very big drop between first and second gear. When Francis Beart was at Daytona, this was a very prominent fault with the gearboxes. The factory got the Burman factory the maker of Norton’s gearboxes to make for the Daytona races a special set of gears, and they are now called the Daytona Gears. Barry had ten sets made, and they are now been produced by RGM Motors.

Can we as the Surrey branch thank Barry for his time and his huge amount of in-depth knowledge for coming and giving us this talk. This along with the fact our room we could not utilise, as the landlord was using it to store the builders equipment in. Along with the TV and the football commentary, and other customers in our very close proximity, Barry gave an evening to remember. and also answered a lot of questions for us all. Any mistakes or inaccuracies are purely mine and not Barry’s. Barry also donated his petrol fee to the Colin Seely charity which we thank him for his very kind generosity.

Our next events are the Annual Dinner on 31st January, a talk by Dave Newman of Newman Cams, on the 11 February. We will also have a stand at the South of England Real Classic Show at Ardingly 29 March 2015, the Kempton Park Southern Classic Show 23 May 2015. There will also be a stand at the South of England Real Classic Ardingly Show, on 25 October 2015. So come and support your branch.

Anthony Curzon

Press Officer Surrey Branch

Other Upcoming Events

Mar
10
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Mar 10 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
Apr
14
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Apr 14 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
May
12
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
May 12 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
Jun
9
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Jun 9 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
Jul
14
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Jul 14 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
Aug
11
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Aug 11 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
Sep
8
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Sep 8 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
Oct
13
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Oct 13 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
Nov
10
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Nov 10 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]
Dec
8
Wed
7:45 pm Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Club Night – CANCELLED until fur... @ The Stepping Stones PH
Dec 8 @ 7:45 pm – 10:45 pm
Club Night - CANCELLED until further notice due to COVID-19 @ The Stepping Stones PH | Westhumble | United Kingdom
We’ve Moved! – Come and find us at our new Meeting venue of ‘The Stepping Stones’ in West Humble – just down from Ryka’s near Box Hill. It’s still the 2nd Wednesday of each month[...]